Health News
Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail
Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) Website

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Posted by Tom Armstrong, Executive Director, U.S. Global Change Research Program

Today, in conjunction with a series of landmark steps announced by the Obama Administration to unleash troves of useful data from the vaults of government, the interagency US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) launched a new online tool that promises to accelerate research relating to climate change and human health—the Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health, or “MATCH.”

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National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail
National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio

Monday, April 22, 2013

Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program

What are the potential effects of global climate change on human health? This is a question that a growing number of federally funded studies seek to answer. A new analysis recently published in the journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, looks at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio on climate change and human health.

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Climate Change Adaptation: Weighing Strategies for Heat-Related Health Challenges Print E-mail
Climate Change Adaptation: Weighing Strategies for Heat-Related Health Challenges

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program

Many public health impacts have been predicted for climate change, but there has been relatively little exploration of ways to minimize the risks and develop long-term adaptation strategies, according to a recent article published in Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP).

A new overview outlines the critical elements needed to address one such impact: heat-related illnesses and deaths, which are expected to increase with more frequent and more intense heat waves. Read the full story on how to adapt to anticipated weather extremes on the EHP website.

 
2013 National Public Health Week (April 1-7) Print E-mail
2013 National Public Health Week

Monday, April 1, 2013

Today marks the beginning of National Public Health Week (NPHW). Since 1995, communities across the United States have designated the first week of April as a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation.

This year's theme is "Public Health is ROI: Save Lives, Save Money." The 2013 NPHW theme was developed to highlight the value of prevention and the importance of well-supported public health systems in preventing disease, saving lives and curbing health care spending. Visit the National Public Health Week website to check out a calendar of events and see how you can get involved.

 
Putting climate change and human health science into practice Print E-mail
Landsat Data Continuity Mission

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program

For the first time, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formally brought together their grantees working on climate change and human health, to share their research findings and discuss practical strategies for implementing this knowledge.

“The goal of this meeting was for grantees to share latest advances, as well as for participants to network with each other to build new relationships and plant the seeds for future collaborations toward solving one of the most critical public health issues facing our world,” said Caroline Dilworth, Ph.D., NIEHS health scientist administrator.

“NIEHS would like to see more meetings like this one, to translate research to scientists in other fields, to decision-makers, and to the public,” said John Balbus, M.D., NIEHS senior advisor for public health. “We need to ensure that significant research findings are integrated into public health planning, as well as ensure that researchers are addressing the topics of greatest concern.” Read the full story on the NIH website.

 
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